Dancing Mice and a Heroic Pursuit

 

A dream is a wish your heart makes, or so it’s been said.  Because no matter how your heart is dreaming, if you keep on believing, the dream that you wish will come true.  Such are the words that have flowed through my home in song in weeks past.  Most of you will quickly pick up on the fact that these are lyrics to one of the songs in Disney’s Cinderella.

Yes.  We have entered a new era of parenting—the love of Disney videos on the part of my daughter.  And while it’s fun to show her classics like this story about the housemaid-and-stepdaughter who lives in a high tower and still remains perpetually cheerful, in some ways we’re not doing much of anything other than helping open those preexisting places in her of hope and of longing.  Hope and longing for something bigger than herself, of adventure and of intimacy.

And while my daughter would not be able to articulate these principles as stated above, it is very evident that she has come prewired for that longing.  Remove those singing mice that can do wonders with a sewing needle and you have something far greater.  As Brent Curtis and John Eldredge said it, in “these two desires of adventure and intimacy come together in us all as a longing to be in a relationship of heroic proportions.”  You have a story that all of us desire—epic gestures of pursuit, passion, and ultimately being known and accepted.

This story echoes an even greater Story, the story of One who transcends time and space to care and redeem for those He loves.  Thanks be to God that we have the opportunity to be a part of His Story.

Don’t Be A Marlin

I am, more oftentimes than not, a Marlin.

No, this is not my post about my being drafted by Miami (the Angels would pick me first anyway).  And I am not referring to the giggling one in Cabo.

The Marlin I’m referring to is that of Nemo’s dad, played by Al Brooks, in Pixar’s Finding Nemo.  In that wonderful film (which to my surprise is nearly 10 years old!), Marlin is a worry wart, a Debbie-downer, and one who is constantly relying on himself and not able to see anything beyond his own two fins.  My own proclivity to Marlinism goes back many years and as I see more and more the ways that I Marlinize, I’m learning that it doesn’t get me anywhere.

In fact, one’s own Marlinishness can only lead to more fretting and less trusting.  The Apostle Paul told the church at Phillipi similar words when he encouraged them not to “worry about anything, but in every situation with prayer and petition, and thanksgiving, present your requests to God.”  Why?  Because then, “the peace of God, which is above all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.”  The benefit of not falling into Marlinism is peace.  God’s peace, and protection in Jesus.

That’s more than anyone could ask for.